Goodbye Kenradical School of History

You’ve probably not noticed but I haven’t blogged for a while here. There’s a good reason for that – I’ve got a new blog!

If you follow this and like this blog please do head over to:

www.radicalhistory.co.uk

It’s far shinier and more lovely.

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Can you beat the teacher?

BBC History Magazine’s online site www.historyextra.com is running a new quiz at the moment called ‘Beat the teacher’ where a different teacher each week gives them questions they’d set one year group.

It’s my quiz this week, so if you think you could pass Year 9 history have a go!

http://www.historyextra.com/quiz/beat-teacher-quiz-could-you-pass-year-9-history

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A First World War scheme of work – 3rd draft

Thanks again for all the feedback on this scheme of work it’s really helped to shape my ideas.

I’ve got to the third draft now of my initial ideas now and actual lessons seem to be emerging. It’s settled quite happily into a ten lesson scheme of work which is perfect for a term’s worth of work. Enough to keep them engaged but not too much.

I’ve moved my initial ideas into a GoogleDoc now:

Rich Kennett – First World War scheme of work

As ever, if you’ve got any more feedback please do send it my way.

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A First World War scheme of work – 2nd draft of initial ideas

A ton of people gave me feedback on my initial ideas so thank you to those folks. In reply to the amount of causality – yes there is a lot but I wanted the assessment on this hence its over emphasis. But I wanted it to be causality plus! as its Year 9 thus the combination of causality and interpretation.

Anyway Draft 2 is below, as before please feel free to give more feedback, it really helped before and has come on leaps and bounds.

WW1 scheme of work

Lesson 1: why are people in Avonmouth digging up horseshoes in their gardens?
Link in with Avonmouth remount depot
Also add in Beauforty Military hospital (now Glenside) (possible link to Stanley Spenser) and link to Arnos Vale cemetery
One Bristol man’s story from the front (need to find this)
End on how did we get here. Use this as hook for causality
Will need simple narrative of war with numbers dead and injured. Macro and micro history

Lesson 2: Marxist interpretation – Imperialism
Rise of empire
Needs to cover Britain. Russia, Germany, etc.
Alliance system. End of splendid isolationism
Grey in London zoo anecdote
Conan Doyle quote
Clip from Joyeux Noel

Lesson 3: Fischer interpretation – Germany
Kaiser
New power
Naval arms race
Kaiser in the bath cartoon

Lesson 4: Clarke interpretation – Serbia
Assassination of FF
Needs more here

Lesson 5&6: Assessment
Something about Combining causality and interpretation.
Explain interpretation
Explain WHY?
Explain your personal interpretation
Essay but with something more.

Lesson 7: Was it all mud and rats? (Needs work)
Life during WW1 on the front.
Needs hook. Could put in Harry Patch for local element or use the audio clip that Jamie Byrom used at TeachMeet
Source based lesson
Comparison of British and German perspectives
Breadth lesson building on themes in lesson 1

Lesson 8: lions led by donkeys? Needs decent q
Haig and Somme
Use Blackadder v funeral footage
Depth lesson on one battle
Link in with memorialisation

Lesson 9: needs enquiry q
Global perspective beyond Western Front
Use TE Lawrence as a focus
Could also look at Jut, Brusilov

Lesson 10: Did life at home get better during ww1? (Needs better q)
DORA, conscription etc
Role of women

Shared from Google Keep

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A First World War scheme of work – very early sketch of ideas

With this being the 100th anniversary of the war I’ve decided that I’m going to redo our First World War scheme of work. It needs to be more challenging and engaging and I feel inspired by the coverage in the media.

Below is a very early plan. If you read this blog I’d hugely appreciate your thoughts. Have I missed something? Is it in a stupid order? Do I need longer on anything? Any feedback gratefully received!

As you’ll quickly tell it’s VERY much note form at the moment so do take that into account.

WW1 scheme of work

Lesson 1: Why are people in Avonmouth digging up horseshoes in their gardens?
Link in with Avonmouth horse depot – local history hook
One Bristol man’s story from the front – narrative history
End on how did we get here. Use this as hook for causality
Will need simple narrative of war with numbers dead and injured. Macro and micro history

Lesson 2: Marxist interpretation – Imperialism
Rise of empire
Needs to cover Britain. Russia, Germany, etc.
End of splendid isolationism
Maybe alliance system here but not sure.

Lesson 3: Fischer interpretation – Germany
Kaiser
New power
Naval arms race

Lesson 4: Clarke interpretation – Serbia
Assassination of FF
Needs more here

Lesson 5&6: Assessment
Something about which interpretation is most accurate. Combining causality and interpretation.
Essay but with something more?

Lesson 7: Was Wilfred Owen correct about life at the front? (I want to use Ivor Gurney if I can find correct poem as more locally relevant)
Life during WW1 on the front.
Source based lesson. Something on source handling. Bit of sly prep for GCSE
Breadth lesson building on themes in lesson 1.

Lesson 8: lions led by donkeys? Needs full enquiry question.
Haig and Somme
Use Blackadder v funeral footage. Chance to question Blackadder a la Gove.
Depth lesson on one battle

Lesson 9: Did life improve at home during WW1? (Needs better enquiry)
DORA, conscription etc
Role of women

Shared from Google Keep

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Black Death – Source paper

I teach OCR Schools History Project A GCSE. This summer the topic for the paper is the Black Death.

I’ve made a revision guide if anyone would like it. It’s below:

Black Death Revision Guide

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The Armenian Rug – how one object can reveal the complex history of genocide

The other day I heard a World Service documentary about a rug made by orphans of the Armenian genocide to thank President Coolidge for letting them reside in the US. A photo of Coolidge stood on the rug is shown to the right.

This is interesting enough object on its own but the continuing story of the rug is fascinating. The rug has remained in storage at the White House for nearly it’s entire life. In 1995 a woman whose mother was one of the orphans who made it requested to see it and said it was in good condition. Last year a new book about the rug was released and the launch event at the Smithsonian was supposed to have the rug in attendance, but last minute the White House refused to release it. Why? No one really knows but there is much speculation that the US do not want to offend the Turkish government who still refuse to recognise the events of 1915 as a genocide.

This a great little story and yet again shows how the history of a single object can reveal the wider complexities of the past. It also very importantly reveals that genocide is still a very politically sensitive topic that is relevant and current in the modern day. Equally it reveals an example of a genocide that many of our students who will solely focus on the Holocaust will be entirely naive of.

If, like me, you think this is a good story and that it would benefit your students I’ve created a simple lesson using the PowerPoint below that through lots of discussion can build to a written activity where students explain what this rug shows us about genocide in the 20th century. It could be a quick starter or with wider discussion could last a lesson. I hope a few of you find it useful.

Armenian Rug Lesson

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